May 25, 2016

The Simple Solution To Drastically Decreasing Dog Bite Statistics

Robin here! Today I have an important article I've whipped up to share with you all. Most people are in shock when them or their child is bitten by a dog. "We didn't see it coming...it came out of nowhere," is what people usually will think or say.

A lot of people have this wary nature around dogs who might be noted as unpredictably aggressive, and though some dogs are harder to read, you can still have some signs. Some dogs will bite out of fear, and some might be aggressive for unknown reasons. However, we all can learn how to prevent bites by learning how to read a dog, am I right?

This is also important to teach your children or any children who might want to pet your pooch. Most people, especially a child, will greet a dog by being very excited and running directly to the front of the dog, immediately petting it and saying all sorts of things to it. They might even try to hug your dog. Most dogs feel threatened by hugs, but Chris loves it, and so do some other dogs! They might have good intentions, but here's the proper way to greet a dog.

1. Turn your body to the side and kneel down. Do not look at the dog or make eye contact with her. Being level with the dog is a less threatening position.

2. You could just let the dog sniff you, or maybe reach out your hand. Remember, in the dog world, you are read by your energy and are identified by your scent.

3. Once the dog begins sniffing you and shows no signs of aggression or fear, feel free to gently stroke the dog's fur.

Even with dogs I know well that I know will not be fearful with me, I still like to greet dogs this way. I'm not worried about some specific dogs I know being threatened by me, but the usual way people greet dogs (you know, the excited, baby talk way) is actually disrespectful in the dog world.

Now, usually parents of children who want to pet your dog will ask, "is your dog good with kids?" An appropriate question to ask the parent is "is your kid good with dogs?" Even if you're pretty certain your dog will not growl at or bite a person even when provoked (remember, if you greet a dog incorrectly dogs feel afraid and feel the need to defend themselves or maybe protect their owners), still make sure the person greets your dog properly.

So, what are some signs of anxiety in dogs that can lead up to an attack?

Moon eye
Lip licking
Tense body language
Flinching away
Whimpering
Trying to stay extremely close to her master

Those are just a few common signs, but there are many more ways to decipher fear in a dog!

Just imagine...there would be thousands of less dog bites and attacks every year if people knew how to simply and respectfully greet a dog and behave around a dog. It really isn't that complicated.

Chris, unlike some other Dachshunds, is great with kids. My five year old sister will hug him and get in his face sometimes, but he couldn't care less. Here's Chris with my sister and one of my brothers. Though Chris loves all people, I'll have to say kids are his favorite!

Though this info can be found around the internet, most of this I've learned from just being with my dogs and from being around strange dogs. I'm around dogs every day, so I've had lots of time to learn more about their many fascinating and strange ways! There's more info I wish I could have covered today, but sometimes it's the basic info that helps prevent dog bites!



















I'd like to know...how are your dogs with strangers, and children in general?

9 comments:

  1. What a great post, this is sum fink all peeps should be aware of
    Loves and licky kisses
    Princess Leah xxx

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  2. Very impawtant information! It makes us cringe sometimes when people post pictures of how "cute" their kids are with their dogs when we see a bite in the future!

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  3. Very good points you made. Thank you
    Lily & Edward

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  4. Hari Om
    Oh look at Chris being a hot dog...(*ahem*)... Robin, what you say is so very very true; even though my Jade was very reliable, there were occasions when she didn't like someone's energy and I (being the one who could read her) would be sure to take action to keep things steady - but I found, sadly, that there are folk who won't listen to the owner and think they know better ... or have 'death wish'... or were just plain **********..... thankfully, no incidents, but more by good fortune than good canine etiquette from other parties! Huggies, YAM-aunty xxx

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  5. Very very informative Post Christmas and Robin!!
    We only have our neighbor's dog in our life. Mom walks Kasi about 3 days a week when Kasi's mom works long days. Kasi is very friend and guess what Mom has never heard her bark one time.
    Kasi rooooooos and rooooooos when mom unlocks their door to go walking
    Hugs madi your bfff

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  6. That is some great information Robin!! Thanks for sharing!

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  7. thanks for such great tips!!! Easy likes the most people, but screaming kids scare him... so we better stay away...

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  8. Really informative as well as impressive article you might have created, this really is worth it to read and that i possess experienced this totally, a good upgraded info is discussed, maintain sharing this kind of valuable info. dogbitelawyerphiladelphia.com

    ReplyDelete

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