May 9, 2016

Save The Animals: Adoption Options

Hi, everyone! Robin here (I kicked Christmas off today), starting our week long clinic, Save The Animals! Chris announced this back on Thursday, and he wrote a sweet little poem about homeless pets to top it off. Tomorrow is the tribute to Forrest and on Friday is the next part of Chris' world tour (he's heading to Canada!) so we'll be skipping those days, but for the rest of the weekdays and the weekend, we'll be doing Save The Animals! I also plan on writing a Save The Animals post each and every Monday.

Anyway, let's begin. We're all somewhat familiar with what pet rescue is, but even if you know lots of about rescue, I'm sure you'll still enjoy this post!

First, if somebody wanted a dog (or a cat, but this is just an example) they would have a few choices of where to look for a dog.

A kill shelter
A no-kill shelter (like the humane society)
A rescue organization
A breeder

Let's take a look into each of these options, shall we?

Kill Shelters

Kill Shelters aren't always necessarily called that, but I'm just calling it that to make sure you all know what I'm talking about. If an animal doesn't get adopted at a shelter in a certain amount of time, they'll be euthanized. Sometimes, even when a "Pit Bull" is brought into the shelter, it'll immediately be put to sleep. Kill shelters are a great place to adopt from, as they have purebreds, mixed breeds, and all sorts of dogs who depend on you!

The reason I put Pit Bull in parenthesis is because over 30 percent of the dogs that enter shelters are labeled Pit Bulls. They could actually be American Staffies, Staffie, Boxers, Bulldogs, or quite often a hodge podge of lots of breeds. A lot of those dogs usually aren't even Pits! Because this isn't a Pit article, I'll get into that some other time.

No-Kill Shelters

No-Kill Shelters are the same as kill shelters, but as the name implies, they do not euthanize the dogs that enter their care. No-Kill shelters, like humane societies, are also great places to look for the dog of your dreams!

Rescue organizations

Rescues are the ones that take in the unwanted dogs. The hurt dogs. The bully breed dogs that nobody wants. Pet rescues pull dogs from shelters and put them in foster homes until the right person steps up to adopt that individual animal. They run on donations, are supported, and have regular adoption events. Rescues also usually accept owner surrenders. That way, if somebody didn't want their dog. whether the reason is good or not, they won't have to bring their dog to a kill shelter where it risks euthanasia.

I've worked with rescue groups in the past and I still do today. Rescues save the lives of the unwanted animals. Unwanted animals and a kill shelter don't mix well. Rescues I believe are the future of pets (they've saved millions of lives) in a way, and I hugely recommend that you adopt from a rescue organization! Some organizations will have dogs and cats, some will just have one of those animals, some rescues take in a variety of breeds, and some rescues focus more on one breed. Whatever it is, rescues are great!

Breeders

To rescue or to "purchase" is a controversial topic among pet parents these days. After all, why "purchase" a high quality pup from a breeder when you save a pet's life? Even though I'm a huge advocate for pet rescues, I also stand for reputable breeding. Selective breeding.

When people say getting a dog from a breeder is "purchasing" the pup, I still consider it to be adopting. You might do what some people call "purchase it", but you are still welcoming that pet home as a member of the family, and I don't see how that's not an adoption. It's not you're displaying your new pup on your dresser...come on, it's a member of your family!

You probably know that Christmas is from a very reputable Dachshund breeder. If I wasn't looking for a show dog, I would never have went the breeder route and instead I would have looked into local rescues or shelters. I've also been supportive of the ones who wisely breed healthy dogs, but rescues help save lives. There wouldn't any rescue dogs though if breeders didn't breed first! However, if you thoroughly learn more about that breeder for reputability, you have some money set aside, maybe want a breed you can't find in rescues, or if you feel the breeder path is the best, breeders offer wonderful pets!

I hope this post has clarified some great information on finding the right place to adopt your next best friend...we'll pick back up on Wednesday!

20 comments:

  1. Hari Om
    This is a fantastic starter for your series, Robin!!! The whole 'breed' issue was never that until the arrival of the 'handbag dog' in the late 1970s. Dogs became fashion items - and disposed as such. Just terrible. Yes I know there are some gorgeous designer dogs (our darling Doodz are an example), but what we simply used to call 'mutts' have now become 'pooraners' and 'colabs' ... and every other variation on LWF (little white fluffies) you care to name. It's the puppy-milling which has the true breeders flinching and as long as people put their dollars into pet shops and on-line buying, that is going to remain a very very big problem.

    sorry to rant a bit darlin', but this is to emphasise that for the majority of folks who are simply looking for the family dog, I totally endorse your 'no-kill' and 'rescue' options!!! Brava and looking forward to more &*> YAM-aunty xxx

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    1. That's okay! I definitely agree with all you said. I hate how dogs have become an accessory or something that should change how a person is judged and treated. For example, I don't think men should feel embarrassed walking a puffy white Poodle, as it is a living creature, not an accessory. It seems society makes it feel like we should just people by the dogs, or how they compare to their dogs. Thanks for the support!

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    2. Hari OM
      oooohhhh I just had to come back today and tell ya - you would not believe it, but I switched the telly on last night and there was a program on how it is that people choose dogs here in UK and with advisers on how NOT to choose one.. right on topic!!! Impulse buying is one of the biggest problems it seems (but then when is it no?!). There is also to be a documentary revealing how very clever the puppy-millers have become, like setting up 'false homes' for the sale of pups. It is a BBC show, so can't link it outside the UK I'm afraid, but I was so excited to see this kind focus being made. &*> Huggies, Yxx

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    3. That's so cool! Puppy mills are not cool however...I'm glad people are taking a stand for ending them! That's why it's so important to make sure a breeder is reputable so you'll know that they're actually a breeder, not a backyard breeder or a puppy mill!

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  2. Great information to share, thanks for the post!

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    1. No problem! I had fun collecting my ideas and opinions for it, along with what I know. Thank you for visiting today!

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    1. Thanks! I wanted to get it out there I definitely support pet rescues and shelters and I recommend that dog lovers adopt from them, reputable breeders are still the future of dog sports.

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  4. Good explanation of each. We have a 'shelter' near us, and you're so right that the big....pit bull-looking dogs seem to be the ones put down. Our Roxy and 6 of her litter were rescued from a high kill shelter and they had a lovely Foster mother until she came to us.

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    1. That's so wonderful! I'll probably write about pit bulls and the problem of breed specific legislation (BSL) later this week.

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  5. Very nice post and well done!

    Your Pals,

    Murphy & Stanley

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  6. Crikey Robin .... you didn't kick Christmas hard did you?? Of course you didn't!! Only jokin'!!!!!! Great post ...... something we a need to hear about. Ill be looking forward to your Monday save the animal posts from now on!!

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    1. Nope! A treat is enough to lure him away. LOL. Thanks for all of your support, Charlie!

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  7. What a great and informative post Robin!!

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  8. there are many ways to find the bestest friend... and I hope that all people avoid puppy mills or stores who sell pets and this back yard breeders who only want to make money on the cost of the poor animals what have the worst life ever there...

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  9. I like that you are including breeders. While we are more rescue folks we understand the need/desire for breeders. These are great options to avoid the puppy mills (which need to be shut down).

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    1. Thanks for the support, Hailey and Phod! I couldn't agree more with what you said. Puppy mills are bad places, but rescues and shelters are the best places to adopt from, and breeders help improve the health of many breeds.

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~Christmas